Smithsonian Magazine

Smithsonian Magazine


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The president was in Chicago when he got the news that he needed to make a decision.

Sloths' slow-paced lifestyle is a survival strategy, not a sign of laziness. #InternationalSlothDay 

Experts say that En Esur, located in modern-day Israel, was a large and cosmopolitan city.

Climate change is driving a surge in wildfires, and it’s only going to get worse.

A ‘toolkit’ found in Sri Lanka adds to growing evidence that early humans inhabited many ecosystems, not just open grasslands.

Caption this: The image, captured by Chinese photographer Yongqing Bao, is titled “The Moment,” and it’s one of the London National History Museum’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year winners.

A new study published in the journal Nature Human Behavior draws on 200 years of literature to assess the validity of an old adage: You are what you read.

A new gene editing tool could make CRISPR more precise

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At midnight on New Year’s Eve, all works first published in the United States in 1923 will enter the public domain. It has been 21 years since the last mass expiration of copyright in the U.S.

How journalists covered the rise of Mussolini and Hitler.

There are whales alive today who were born before "Moby Dick" was written.

A new discovery from the University of Florida reveals a real-life planet actually clocking in at coordinates eerily reminiscent of the fictional M-Class planet.

NASA astronauts Christina Koch and Jessica Meir have completed their spacewalk, becoming the first two women to venture outside the International Space Station at the same time.

Esanbe Hanakita Kojima, as the island is called, may have been eroded by wind and ice floes.

The publication taught its readers how to be healthy skeptics—a lesson that media consumers need more today than ever. #InternationalJokeDay 

Although she’s often overshadowed by her husband, Frederick Douglass, Anna Murray Douglass made his work possible.

“If you’re discarding a bra you can cut the clasps off and send them to us we use them for turtle shell repair.”

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