Foreign Affairs

Foreign Affairs


In-depth insight and analysis on international affairs and U.S. foreign policy since 1922. Sign up for our newsletter: https://t.co/LuDofzH1Gu

767566 followers  •  2003 follow  •    •   https://t.co/83wqGhaXRu

In a series of speeches this summer, senior Trump administration officials have cast the United States and China as antagonists in a new Cold War. @McFaul  argues that the analogy is both inaccurate and counterproductive:

“The United States needs not only to demilitarize policing but to decolonize it.” @jgo34  examines the close links between U.S. imperial wars and the militarization of U.S. police forces over the past century:

For all its geopolitical complexity, AI competition boils down to a simple technical triad: data, algorithms, and computing power. If they maintain the advantage in computing power, the U.S. & its allies will be positioned to compete, @BuchananBen  argues.

Chinese leaders are weighing the costs and benefits of a harder line on Taiwan as they take the measure of U.S. and international willpower, Michael Green and Evan Medeiros write. Those calculations could rest on the U.S. response to the new Hong Kong law.

@MrKRudd  considers the risk of armed conflict between the U.S. and China in the coming months and years:

Loading
Loading

“The current pandemic has distracted international observers from Hong Kong’s struggle and left many local residents fearful of crowds. Chinese authorities know it.”

Beijing has long understood that harnessing information can be a means of exercising geopolitical power, @rosenbergerlm  writes. And as the novel coronavirus spreads around the globe, China is resorting to extreme measures.

Hong Kong’s status as an autonomous region that respected the rule of law and protected human rights helped make the city a capital of international finance, writes Michael C. Davis. This achievement is now at risk.

Under Xi, the Chinese political system is becoming ever more closed—making the service provided by the foreign press corps even more valuable. @JEPomfret  discusses the implications of China’s expulsion of reporters from three major U.S. newspapers:

“Beijing’s recent actions in Hong Kong—and elsewhere in Asia—raise worrying questions about its evolving objectives and increasing willingness to use coercive tactics to achieve them.”

Loading
Loading