Adam Servianski

Adam Servianski


Senior Editor, @TheAtlantic adam@theatlantic.com

360591 followers  •  2324 follow  •  Quito  •  

@emmamanny111  @jbouieT  @ditzkoffh  @jesseltaylorey ’re not doing that. They’re lamenting that they can’t engage in egregious racial caricature without risk of backlash, especially given the historic potential for propaganda. (You can’t even make Birth of a Nation anymore!)

@cjane87  yeah @EichenIke  i'm @JasonKruszkanot  going to say something could "never " happen. I will say this is how most other democracies work and i haven't seen that happen yet.

@cjane87  Righ@EichenIket  you @JasonKruszka  can filibuster bad policies, and you can also filibuster the dyer bill and the civil rights act. There are consequences either way, but only one of these allows an elected majority to govern according to its mandate, and for the electorate to then respond accordingly.

@cjane87  they @EichenIke  do, @JasonKruszkaall  the time, in the states, and the filibuster means nothing can be done about it even when those decisions are unpopular and the product of successful efforts to insulate legislators from electoral backlash. We're already living in that world.

This is idiotic. People do not have to go to sporting events. They do have to go to work.

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There’s really no difference between Trump tweeting executive orders at his television while watching fox news and this.

It's amazing that this is the majority's argument: If Congress meant to authorize OSHA to act so broadly during a once-in-century pandemic, it would have done so previously, when there was no pandemic. checkmate, libs.

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@Anon64210061  The argument is that covid is everywhere, so it’s not a particularly workplace related hazard. But it obviously is for anyone who works indoors.

The vaccine mandate cases show that the future of SCOTUS hinges less on the text of the law or the Constitution than the capricious process of conservative identity formation, where something as benign as vaccines can become a culture war battlefield

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The president is threatening violence against people who protest him

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The question is now: how many Republican officials were profiting off their secret foreknowledge of a mass casualty event while the president and his propaganda network were assuring everyone that the coronavirus was “contained?”

Watching the Roy Moore re-endorsements I'm reminded of the many, many times I've seen white people on cable news arguing black culture is excessively tolerant of criminal behavior.

When they say they’re willing to die for the economy what they mean is they’re willing to let you die for the economy.

That Chance tweet is an example of a larger problem, which is viewing the presidency as a vessel for your hopes and dreams rather than as a job that requires particular skills/talents/temperament/knowledge to do well

Here is my response to Alito, who demands to be seen as apolitical while acting politically, who demands civil discourse while he smears his critics, and who describes the press as sensational for rejecting his mischaracterizations of verifiable facts.

The first big vote by mail controversy was FDR wanting to help the troops vote but the Dixiecrats freaking out that doing so could help enfranchise black people. Anyway just a random historical fact obviously unrelated to anything today

Black writers spent five years saying what this was, where it came from, and where it could lead. Their critics snickered about “wokeness,” condescended from their columns, think tanks, and tenured positions, and lied to themselves thinking they’d never have to face it.

Call me when OLIVE oil is under $2 a barrel

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