Quite Interesting

Quite Interesting


Quite Interesting facts from the team behind the BBC TV show QI. https://t.co/KajPX02jPd https://t.co/e7kKHcHU2N https://t.co/q3qVciWTD7

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A group of ostriches is known as 'a wobble'.

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Dr. Samuel Johnson, author of the famous English dictionary, collected orange peel but refused to say why.

There may be said to be two classes of people in the world; those who constantly divide the people of the world into two classes, and those who do not. ROBERT BENCHLEY

Turkey has a province, a city and a river all called Batman.

Thanks to everyone who sent feedback about the wording of this tweet and the phrase 'evolved twice' - we've since brought it down. Here's some more reading on this fascinating story: Natural History Museum: blog: @Evolutionistrue 

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The abbreviation ‘O.M.G.’ was first used in 1917 by Admiral John Arbuthnot "Jacky" Fisher in a letter to Winston Churchill.

A historical basis for some of the plagues of Egypt may have been after-effects of a real volcanic eruption. This could have turned the Nile red, driven frogs and insects to seek fresh water, and caused acid rain and dust clouds.

Word of the Day: SPAGHETTIFICATION - the process by which an object is stretched and ripped apart if it falls into a black hole.

An average Victorian living room could contain up to 2.5 kilograms of arsenic, which was an ingredient in wallpaper, rugs, furniture, and children’s toys.

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Until 1979, Sweden classified homosexuality as a mental illness. That year, activists took the classification as an illness to its logical extent - Swedes called in too gay to go to work.

Word of the day: TASLEEK (Saudi Arabic) - to nod along and pretend you care what another person is saying

On October 1st 1861, Charles Darwin wrote in his diary: ‘I am very poorly today and very stupid and hate everybody and everything’

In English, a "French exit" is to sneak out of a party without telling anyone. In French, it is known as "partir à l’anglaise" - to leave the English way.

Word of the Day: ÁILLEÁNACH (Irish) - an attractive and yet useless man.

Word of the day: HIMBO (late 80s slang) - an attractive but unintelligent man

Word of the day: BORIS-NORIS (19th century) - to go on blindly, without any thought of risk or decency

2 minutes and 44 seconds of Sandi Toksvig hugging people. That's it. That's the tweet.

Independence from Britain is celebrated somewhere in the world, on average, one in every seven days.

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