National Geographic

National Geographic


Welcome to National Geographic Magazine, where on-the-ground reporting combined with award-winning photography informs our community about our planet.

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Concocting a COVID-19 vaccine is not the same thing as proving a vaccine is safe and effective, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases tells National Geographic.

The magnitude 7.1 earthquake rushed eastward and upward, then boomeranged back along the upper section of the fault at incredible speeds—so fast it caused the geologic version of a sonic boom.

In this Baltic seaport, perhaps not revolution but certainly rebellion is still alive. The city has defied the ruling Law and Justice party and gained a reputation for tolerance—even when other parts of the country have not.

About a year’s worth of data collected by NASA's Dawn spacecraft—during its final orbits before running out of fuel—show that the dwarf planet has mounds and hills that formed when ice melted and refroze after an asteroid impact about 20 million years ago.

As conservation groups reckon with racist legacies, some see an opportunity to shed light on Alabama Hills’ Indigenous roots.

Take a closer look at African elephants in the Abu Concession area in Botswana's Okavango Delta. Happy #WorldElephantDay !

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On #WorldElephantDay , learn about the all-female wildlife ranger team, called the Akashinga, that protects Zimbabwe's most iconic wildlife.

Women have been running for higher office since before they could vote, but no woman has yet served as president or vice president.

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Spinosaurus has made history as the first known swimming dinosaur. In our story—with exclusive photos—we detail how a newfound fossil tail is changing what we know about dinosaurs. For more historic stories like this, subscribe to National Geographic:

Researchers found a vast network of ancient Maya cities that was home to millions more people than previously thought.

When scientists say bears are going extinct, I want people to realize what it looks like," says photographer Paul Nicklen, who captured this gut-wrenching footage in the Baffin Islands.

“It’s hard for an individual—or a country—to evolve past discomfort if the source of the anxiety is only discussed in hushed tones.”

The 50-foot-long, seven-ton Spinosaurus had a long sail on its back, an elongated snout, and—now we've confirmed—a tail that resembles a bony paddle. The newfound fossil stretches our understanding of how and where dinosaurs lived.

It’s unclear whether cancer made Buddy more susceptible to contracting the coronavirus, or if the virus made him ill, or if it was just a case of coincidental timing.

Sea turtles are one of a small number of species alive today that once roamed with dinosaurs, as far back as 150 million years ago. Happy #WorldTurtleDay !

In our November issue, we're launching a year of celebrating the power of women’s voices and how they’re changing the world. Use #NatGeoWomenofImpact  to share how a woman in your life has empowered you—and tag a friend to do the same! Learn more here:

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