Smithsonian NMAAHC

Smithsonian NMAAHC


Journey through the lens of the African American experience. #APeoplesJourney, #ANationsStory Legal: https://t.co/VVMfPedjBA

220837 followers  •  1000 follow  •    •   https://t.co/U0ID4FE1NV

The Enforcement Acts were three bills passed by congress between 1870 and 1871. The acts protected African Americans' right to vote, to hold office, to serve on juries, and the receive equal protection of laws. #VoteHistory  #APeoplesJourney  #ANationsStory 

tweet picture

In 1892, journalist and activist Ida B. Wells began publishing articles investigating lynching after the murders of her friend and his business associates by a lynch mob. The next year, she published "A Red Record," a personal examination of lynchings in the US. #WomensE3 

tweet picture

Our 2020 #WomensE3  Summit panel discussion will focus on the history of voting and how we are dealing in the climate of two pandemic: Health and Social Justice. Panel: Voting in the Age of a Global Pandemic and Social Injustice CrisisTune In:

tweet picture

The phrase “black is beautiful” referred to a broad embrace of black culture and identity. It called for an appreciation of the black past as a worthy legacy, and it inspired cultural pride in contemporary black achievements. More:

Kobe Bryant’s “Black Mamba” mentality propelled him to the upper echelon of sports and inspired millions of people around the world. Bryant played twenty seasons with the Los Angeles Lakers— winning five NBA championships, two NBA Finals MVP awards, and one league MVP award.

tweet picture

The 15th Amendment stated that no one could be denied the right to vote based on “race, color or previous condition of servitude.” It challenged voting laws in the North and South. #VoteHistory  #APeoplesJourney  #ANationsStory 

tweet picture

The Voting Rights Act of 1965 opened the door to political participation & black Americans rushed through. Nationwide, the number of black elected officials increased from 1,469 in 1970 to 4,912 in 1980. #VoteHistory  #APeoplesJourney  #ANationsStory 

tweet picture

During Reconstruction, Thanksgiving was embraced by black families—with many dishes linked to the food of slavery, and some representing the glory of freedom. Learn more about #Thanksgiving  food traditions: #APeoplesJourney 

tweet picture

Loading
Loading

#OTD in 1865, enslaved African Americans were notified of their freedom by Union troops in Galveston Bay, TX—two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was issued. Known as #Juneteenth , this day is widely celebrated as the end of chattel slavery in the U.S. #APeoplesJourney 

tweet picture

In July of 1963, fifteen girls were jailed for challenging segregation laws. Ages 12 to 15, they were held for 45 days in the back woods of Leesburg, Georgia. Their parents had no knowledge of where authorities were holding their children: #HiddenHerstory 

tweet picture

A statement from our Founding Director Lonnie Bunch on the noose found in our history galleries today.

tweet picture

A deserving hug between @repjohnlewis  and @POTUS . It's been a long journey and we're all grateful to be here.…

tweet picture

Thomas Jefferson drafted the Declaration of Independence and called slavery an “abominable crime,” yet he was a lifelong slaveholder. His statue stands in our Slavery & Freedom exhibition with the names of the 600 men, women and children he enslaved at Monticello. #ANationsStory 

tweet picture

Loading
Loading