London Review of Boo

London Review of Boo


Europe’s leading magazine of culture and ideas, published twice a month.

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‘A fiction doesn’t have to be untrue, only hypothetical. “Who can boast of being a mere imposter?” Borges asked. The counterfactual by contrast knows very well what it is not. It targets the facts it wishes to overturn or replace.’ Michael Wood:

Can we not sit down with former enemies, with those whom we distrust, & hammer out institutions which will settle our relationships & preserve our differences? Is it too much to ask that we invest in the future for a change? John Hume on peace in Ireland:

Announcing the #londonreviewofsuitcases ! Inspired by Frances Stonor Saunders’s memoir, part 2 of which appears in our summer issue, over on Instagram we’re inviting you to show us a suitcase & tell us its story. Full details here:

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For good and for bad – mostly bad – the initial constitution displayed a striking resilience, inhibiting efforts to elevate former slaves, protect them against resentful whites, or undergird their new freedom with socio-economic support. Randall Kennedy:

Ropes resemble sinews and tangled nerves; fibreglass forms brittle cells and chambers; an open steel cube bristles with grey vinyl tubing. Even now, the sheer bodiliness of these pieces reminds us that sculpture offers surrogates for corporeal experience.

Many Western critics accuse Huawei of acting as a vehicle and agent of Beijing. But perhaps it is something more than this, a kind of modern company-state operating in a world where kinds of empire still exist. Linda Colley on company-states:

‘The friend-enemy distinction has become a new type of “judgment device”, in which my preferences and tastes are most easily decided by the fact that they’re not yours. Things which you hate must ipso facto be good.’ @davies_will  on polarised politics:

Seamus Perry and Mark Ford are back for another episode of Close Readings, this time looking at Robert Frost, the great American poet of fences and dark woods. Listen on our website or wherever you get your podcasts:

‘From my father’s extreme economy in talking about the past, I always knew there was much he wanted to forget, and yet the suitcase tells me he had not embraced the art of letting go.’ Part 1 of ‘The Suitcase’, a memoir by Frances Stonor Saunders:

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'Women are seen as taking something to which they are not naturally entitled.' Watch the full lecture:

Assange and WikiLeaks did what all journalists should do, which is to make important information available to the public, enabling people to make evidence-based judgments about the actions of their governments. Patrick Cockburn:

Lucy Prebble: 'Everybody has a Harvey story. Mine is unlurid but revealing.'

We’re delighted to announce that the new is now live and – surprise! – we’ve disappeared the paywall. Our archive, containing 17,500 pieces & much more, is available for all to read, without limits, until 15/1. Stand by for suggestions and happy Christmas!

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In 1983, we published an essay by Oliver Sacks with the title 'The man who mistook his wife for a hat.' Here it is:

Jenny Diski’s 150 articles (and 65 blogs) for the LRB are all now freely available to read online: 

All of John Ashbery's poems for the LRB may be found here:

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This prerogative act may be open to legal challenge on more than one ground. And the challenges now being brought before the courts in Edinburgh and London could well be of lasting constitutional significance. A new essay by Stephen Sedley:

Our new issue is now online. For the first time in the LRB's history, it contains just one piece (alongside the usual columns): Andrew O’Hagan’s investigation into the Grenfell Tower fire and its political aftermath.

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