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"She died saying: I want to be cured. I want to go home." Sadako Sasaki passed away at age 12 from the effects of the Hiroshima atomic bomb. She became a symbol of the toll of nuclear war on civilians. Her brother, a survivor of the attack, retells her story.

“She died saying: I want to be cured. I want to go home.” Sadako Sasaki passed away at age 12 from the effects of the Hiroshima atomic bomb. She became a symbol for the toll of nuclear war on civilians. Her brother, a survivor of the attack, retells her story.

Sadako Sasaki died at age 12 from the effects of the Hiroshima atomic bomb. She became a symbol of the toll of nuclear war on civilians. Her brother, a survivor of the attack, retells her story.

"She died saying: I want to be cured. I want to go home." Sadako Sasaki passed away at age 12 from the effects of the Hiroshima atomic bomb. She became a symbol of the toll of nuclear war on civilians. Her brother, a survivor of the attack, retells her story.

As Hiroshima marks the 75th anniversary of the world’s first atomic attack, we revisit the story of Sadako Sasaki - the girl that became the icon for world peace.

“I will write peace on your wings and you will fly all over the world.” - Sadako Sasaki. ... 8:15am, 75 years ago. ... 📷 Hiroshima, Japan, 2019.

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[From 2018] After Sadako Sasaki's death, the story behind Hiroshima's paper cranes is still unfolding

sadako sasaki'>Twelve-year-old Sadako Sasaki and her 1,000 origami cranes for peace after suffering radiation poisoning following the Hiroshima Bombing will have her story told on the international stage. #SadakoSasaki  #Hiroshima  #origami  #papercranes  #atomicbombing 

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Origami cranes are a symbol of a nuclear weapon-free world after Hiroshima survivor Sadako Sasaki developed leukaemia and tried to fold 1000 cranes to receive a wish. Sadly she died before reaching her target. In 2017 @nuclearban  were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. #origamiday 

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Sadako Sasaki and her friends folded hundreds of paper cranes to help cure her illness and inadvertently created an international symbol of peace

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