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Just in: A biography of chef & restaurateur Leah Chase, SIGNED by her.

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Today, we're revisiting the life and work of Leah Chase, legendary chef and owner of Dooky Chase's in New Orleans.

How does renaming Jefferson Davis Parkway after Norman Francis sound? What about Leah Chase? Or Dorothy Mae Taylor? They're all possibilities as the New Orleans City Council is proposing to rename the roadway as part of a bigger initiative. MORE:

ONE YEAR AGO TODAY: On June 1, 2019, New Orleans icon Leah Chase passed away surrounded by her family. We miss you, Leah. >>

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On #InternationalWomensDay , we're remembering leah chase'>Chef Leah Chase. @rehemaellis  met Chase last year at her famous Dooky Chase's Restaurant - a fixture of New Orleans’ historical and culinary scenes for more than 70 years.

In celebration of Black History Month, @T_Armstead72  paid a visit to the iconic Dooky Chase's Restaurant in Treme to learn about its history and the lasting legacy of world-renowned leah chase'>Chef Leah Chase!

Happy birthday to the late, great Leah Chase. The Queen of Creole Cuisine would have been 97 today. (AP Photo by Cheryl Gerber) #Beon4  ?❤

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The Creole gumbo created by the late Leah Chase has been served for decades to freedom riders, civil rights leaders, presidents, and black students in a still segregated New Orleans who wanted to go somewhere nice after prom

No one but @LolisEricElie  could truly capture the complicated and nuanced life of Leah Chase.

Leah Chase's enduring legacy and independent spirit remembered on this Twelfth Night

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What a life. American history has always been driven by visionaries like Leah Chase—and all the men and women who worked and ate at Dooky Chase’s over the years—folks who serve up progress one bowl of gumbo at a time.

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Farewell, Leah Chase. New Orleans says goodbye to its queen of Creole cuisine?

Leah Chase, New Orleans’ matriarch of Creole cuisine, who fed civil rights leaders, musicians and presidents in a career spanning seven decades, has died. She was 96.

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Writing the @nytimes  obituary for Leah Chase was a great and terribly sad honor.

Rest in Peace Ms. Leah Chase, Queen of Creole Cuisine...

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Leah Chase was a national treasure. Civil rights leader, rebel, chef, activist, leader, icon, incredible human. What a massive loss to the world. Love to her family and to New Orleans.

Leah Chase. Legend. What a life. What an amazing force. If you don’t know her story please read this...

New Orleans chef and civil rights icon Leah Chase, who created the city's first white-tablecloth restaurant for black patrons, ignored city segregation laws and introduced countless tourists to Southern Louisiana Creole cooking, died Saturday at age 96.

Leah Chase, New Orleans’ matriarch of Creole cuisine, dead at 96: family

leah chase'>Chef Leah Chase, civil rights activist and legendary 'Queen of Creole Cuisine,' dies at age 96 Thanks to People like her, we become a better Nation! At ⁦⁩ we will pay respect @WCKitcheno  your legacy of Feeding and healing one meal at the time!

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