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My Inauguration Day free episode of Rumble, with special thanks to Langston Hughes. “Let America Be America”. Apple: SpotifyGoogle

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Very impressed with 2023 DB Terrance Love 6’3” 200 langston hughes'>Fairborn Langston Hughes HS, GA. This young man has great length, long arms quick hands and feet and 4.5 speed. He can hit and cover. Exceptional range. GPA is 4.0. Right now a 4*+ could be 5* by next year. @terranc3love 

1 of the top RB prospects in the south is 2022 Antonio Martin 5‘10“ 200 Langston Hughes HS, GA. Shows all the tools needed to dominate at the next level. Size, speed, vision, balance, burst and production @AntonioMartinJ3  3.3 GPA. Averages over a first down a carry.

Five Lorca poems, translated by Langston Hughes, as they appeared in the pages of the The New Masses in January 1938. Published online by @BeineckeLibrary 

@haselbysam  @chrisgbedforda  @EnricoFermi18nd  while this isn’t the civil rights movement proper, here is langston hughes in 1937 making an explicit connection between home and abroad

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Naomi Long Madgett, the longtime poet laureate of Detroit, has died at 97. A champion of Black poets as a publisher, editor and teacher, she was a mentee of Langston Hughes and went on to win hundreds of awards — including three honorary degrees.

“Hughes’s poetry and his translations forged a direct line between the new Negroes in Harlem and the Pan-Africans in Paris, Havana, Rio, Lagos, Dakar, Kings­ton, and Port-au-Prince.” — Henry Louis Gates, Jr., on Langston Hughes, 1989

“Hughes’s poetry and his translations forged a direct line between the new Negroes in Harlem and the Pan-Africans in Paris, Havana, Rio, Lagos, Dakar, Kings­ton, and Port-au-Prince.” — Henry Louis Gates, Jr., on Langston Hughes, 1989

“Hughes’s poetry and his translations forged a direct line between the new Negroes in Harlem and the Pan-Africans in Paris, Havana, Rio, Lagos, Dakar, Kings­ton, and Port-au-Prince.” — Henry Louis Gates, Jr., on Langston Hughes, 1989

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I, too, sing America... Tomorrow, I'll be at the table When company comes. Nobody'll dare Say to me, "Eat in the kitchen," Then. Besides, They'll see how beautiful I am And be ashamed— I, too, am America. ~Langston Hughes

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I, too, sing America... Tomorrow, I'll be at the table When company comes. Nobody'll dare Say to me, "Eat in the kitchen," Then. Besides, They'll see how beautiful I am And be ashamed— I, too, am America. ~Langston Hughes

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''I swear to the Lord I still can't see Why Democracy means Everybody but me.’’ – Langston Hughes#NationalPoetryMonth 

What happens to a dream deferred? Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun? Or fester like a sore— And then run? Does it stink like rotten meat? Or crust and sugar over— like a syrupy sweet? Maybe it just sags like a heavy load. Or does it explode? Langston Hughes

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Hold fast to dreams For if dreams die Life is a broken-winged bird That cannot fly. Hold fast to dreams For when dreams go Life is a barren field Frozen with snow. —Langston Hughes#NationalPoetryDay 

I, too, sing America... Tomorrow, I'll be at the table When company comes. Nobody'll dare Say to me, "Eat in the kitchen," Then. Besides, They'll see how beautiful I am And be ashamed— I, too, am America. ~Langston Hughes#BlackHistoryMonth 

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Share the powerful poetry of Langston Hughes in honor of his birthday and the first day of #BlackHistoryMonth .

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