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Today’s African proverb: Anyone who utters an insult in the market knows exactly who he's referring to. A Hausa proverb sent by Muhammad Makintami, Maiduguri, Nigeria. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula.

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Today’s African#proverb : Good beads do not make noise. An Akan proverb sent by Yaw Osei Owusu, Accra, Ghana. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula.

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Today’s African#proverb : Ears are a sea. A Kalenjin proverb sent by Bartai Araap, Chebunyo, Kenya. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula

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Today’s African proverb: When the mother goat chews grass, her kid watches. An Igbo proverb sent by Okwuenu Prosper and Cynthia Echeme, both from Nigeria. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula.

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Today’s African#proverb : If someone dies in the market there is no need to announce their funeral. Sent by Raymond Agyenim Boateng and Appiah Darko, both from Ghana. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula

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Today’s African#proverb : Don't step on a snake thinking it's thin. A Tigrinya proverb sent by F Kidane, Geleba, Eritrea. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula

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Today’s African#proverb : The body pays for a slip of the foot, and gold pays for a slip of the tongue. A Malawian proverb sent by Anthony Kalolo Chingala, Blantyre, Malawi. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula.

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Today’s African#proverb : An old person is medicine. A Kisii proverb sent by Brian Teri and Enock Masase, both from Kenya. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula.

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Today’s African#proverb : It is the tasty soup that draws the table closer. An Ewe proverb sent by Afari Ishmael, Accra, Ghana. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula

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Today’s African#proverb : Sneezewood begets ashes. A Xhosa proverb sent by Pinky, Johannesburg, South Africa. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula.

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Today’s African proverb: The wisdom of others will not allow an elder to be called a fool. A Yoruba proverb sent by Adedeji Adeyemi, Ibadan, Nigeria. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula

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Today’s African proverb: Do not curse the sun before it sets. A Swahili proverb sent by Denish Odingo, Kisumu, Kenya. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula.

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Today’s African#proverb : Ignorance is darker than the night. A Hausa proverb sent by Sunday Bello, Kaduna, Nigeria. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula

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Today’s African#proverb : Treat a guest as a guest for two days, on the third day give him a hoe. A Swahili proverb sent by Notorious Chabiet, Rumbek, South Sudan. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula ✏️

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Today’s African#proverb : When vultures surround you, try not to die. Sent by Ibn Jamel, London, UK, and Paul Walshak, Nigeria. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula

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Today’s #proverb '>African #proverb : Being taller than your father does not mean you are older than him. Sent by Ubong Sylvester, Akwa Ibom, Nigeria. How do you interpret this proverb?  Illustration by George Wafula

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Today’s African proverb: If a bird does not fly, it goes to bed hungry. An Akan proverb sent by Herbertha Morrison, Accra, Ghana. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula ✏️

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Today’s African#proverb : The goat that cries the loudest is not the one that will eat the most. Sent by Mabor Dut, Cairo, Egypt. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula ✏️

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Today’s African proverb: A bird with a weak skull does not challenge a woodpecker to a fight. An Igbo proverb sent by Cornelius Chinedu Adonu and Okafor Sampson, both from Nigeria. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula ✏️

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