Results for greek latin

Add to feed Create your own feed

Latest

How translations of Ancient Greek and Latin texts have shaped our perceptions of people.

Finally I believe I can convince y'all over the argument of why we should prefer Latin over Greek: "For the suffix more commonly spelt -ise in British English, OUP policy dictates a preference for the spelling -ize, e.g., realize vs. realise. The rationale is etymological...".

There’s a trove of Western literature that Oxford-educated@SpencerKlavan  aims to reveal in @YngHereticsShow . Armed with a doctorate in classical Greek and Latin literature, his focus will be on why and how you ought to read it to form your worldviews.

There’s a trove of Western literature that Oxford-educated@SpencerKlavan  aims to reveal in @YngHereticsShow . Armed with a doctorate in classical Greek and Latin literature, his focus will be on why and how you ought to read it to form your worldviews.

There’s a trove of Western literature that Oxford-educated@SpencerKlavan  aims to reveal in @YngHereticsShow . Armed with a doctorate in classical Greek and Latin literature, his focus will be on why and how you ought to read it to form your worldviews.

There’s a trove of Western literature that Oxford-educated@SpencerKlavan  aims to reveal in @YngHereticsShow . Armed with a doctorate in classical Greek and Latin literature, his focus will be on why and how you ought to read it to form your worldviews.

There’s a trove of Western literature that Oxford-educated@SpencerKlavan  aims to reveal in @YngHereticsShow . Armed with a doctorate in classical Greek and Latin literature, his focus will be on why and how you ought to read it to form your worldviews.

#ExpressResearch | The Sanskrit for ‘father’ is ‘pitar’. It is ‘pater’ in Greek and Latin, ‘padre’ in Spanish, ‘pere’ in French, and ‘vader’ in German #WorldSanskritDay 

#ExpressResearch | The Sanskrit for ‘father’, ‘pitar’ is ‘pater’ in Greek and Latin, ‘padre’ in Spanish, ‘pere’ in French, and ‘vader’ in German.

How many times have you mangled the word epidemiology? Professor of linguistics, Kate Burridge, explores how different our medical words would be if we hadn't swiped all this vocab from Greek/Latin and French @SammyJ_comedian 

tweet picture

Loading
Loading

Most relevant

Hērō from ancient Greek and Latin roots, SERVO — guardian, protector, preserver of the whole; SERVANT. Our heroes are SERVANT LEADERS of the greater good. With clarity of purpose, their contributions are IN SERVICE to the whole of humanity.

tweet picture

This is a Venn diagram of the overlap between the Cyrillic, Greek, and Latin alphabets. (Image: Watchduck.)

tweet picture

People said he could write a sentence in Latin with one hand while simultaneously writing the same sentence in Greek with the other. How much do you know about the U.S.'s first left-handed President? #LeftHandersDay 

tweet picture

The brown bear’s scientific name (Ursus arctos) means ‘bear’ twice. ‘Ursus' is the Latin for bear; ‘arctos' means the same in Greek. (Image: Yathin S Krishnappa)

tweet picture

The ‘h’ in ‘Thames’ was added in 1649 by scholars who incorrectly assumed a Greek rather a Latin origin (as with ‘author’ and ‘Anthony’).

I am schooled in the classics and speak Greek and ancient Latin fluently #alternativefact 

Venn diagram showing which uppercase letter glyphs are shared by the Greek, Latin and Cyrillic alphabets.

tweet picture

Word of the day: HELLENOMANIA - the excessive use of Latin or Greek terms where understandable English words would've been more appropriate.

Loading
Loading