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Feeding wildlife runs against the usual advice. But after Australia's bush fires robbed brush-tailed rock wallabies of their natural foraging grounds, wildlife officials began a mission in January to drop food every 10 days by helicopter.

Animal charity Aussie Ark said it has found dead brush tailed rock wallabies, who died due to a lack of food and water in one of their main habitats.

Scientists are looking for surviving representatives of rare species including the kangaroo-like brush-tailed rock wallabies and helping threatened creatures get enough food and water in recently scorched forests.

In an effort to feed brush-tailed rock-wallabies affected by the fires, officials dropped more than 4,000 pounds (2,100 kilograms) of sweet potatoes and carrots across different colonies last week, according to a statement from the NSW Government.

The New South Wales government is working to make sure the brush-tailed rock-wallabies affected by the Australian bushfires are fed as part of a post-fire wildlife recovery effort. #FOX59Morning 

Happy to hear about Operation Rock Wallaby, an aerial project to save endangered brush-tailed rock wallabies that survived the fires but are left with no food. @akooser  reports they've dropped 2+ tons of carrots & sweet potatoes to 12+ wallaby colonies.

In case you missed it: Thousands of pounds of carrots and sweet potatoes have been air-dropped to help feed the Brush-tailed Rock Wallabies in Australia whose habitats have been devastated by massive brushfires.

Helicopters are dropping carrots and sweet potatoes to help endangered Brush-tailed Rock-Wallabies.

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Thousands of kilograms of carrots and sweet potato are being delivered to endangered Brush-tailed Rock-wallabies in fire affected areas as the NSW Government steps in to help. #9News 

OPERATION WALLABY: Thousands of kilograms of carrots and sweet potato are being delivered to endangered Brush-tailed Rock-wallabies in fire affected areas as the NSW Government steps in to help. #9News 

The New South Wales government used aircraft to drop more than 4,000 pounds of food, mostly carrots and sweet potatoes, to colonies of brush-tailed rock-wallabies that were left stranded as massive wildfires ravaged their habitat.

With fires still blazing in Australia, brush-tailed rock-wallabies are getting by with a little help from public servants.

In case you missed it: Thousands of pounds of carrots and sweet potatoes have fallen from the sky in Australia, air-dropped to help feed the Brush-tailed Rock wallabies whose habitats have been devastated by massive brushfires.

Australian officials are air-dropping thousands of sweet potatoes and carrots to help the brush-tailed rock-wallabies recovering from wildfires below

The 1st pair of adored brush-tailed rock-wallabies are released into a sanctuary to save the endangered species from extinction

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