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Before being forced into internment camps in WWII, Japanese American families owned land across Los Angeles. FOX 11’s Sandra Endo uncovers one family's underlying history in Manhattan Beach.​

Before being forced into internment camps in WWII, Japanese American families owned land across Los Angeles. FOX 11’s Sandra Endo uncovers one family's underlying history in Manhattan Beach.​

Black couple Willa and Charles Bruce purchased land on Manhattan Beach in 1912, making them among the first Black landowners in the city. 12 years later they were forced off their property as it was seized by the city.

Black couple Willa and Charles Bruce purchased land on Manhattan Beach in 1912, making them among the first Black landowners in the city. 12 years later they were forced off their property as it was seized by the city.

Just learned one of the Manhattan DA candidates was arrested for weed at a Phish show in '95 at Jones Beach. Representation matters. I feel seen.

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A century ago, Willa and Charles Bruce owned and operated an oceanfront resort in Manhattan Beach, one of the first run by and servicing Black residents. Their White neighbors and the KKK tried to run them out with threats and harassment.

“Are we going to go all the way back to Native Americans [and give their land back]? Where does that stop?” says a White resident of Manhattan Beach, shedding light on the local opposition to returning land taken from a Black family one century ago.

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A Black family's beach property in Manhattan Beach -- a Southern California town known for its scenic expanse -- was taken during the Jim Crow era. Now, Los Angeles County officials are giving it back, and it's worth perhaps $75 million.

The descendants of a Black family that once owned a thriving oceanfront resort in Manhattan Beach could get the property back under state legislation announced Friday.

On President's Day in the waters off of Manhattan Beach, a racist scuffle, now referred to as the "incident" exposed a dark side to the localism customs that dominate surfing. It spurred a racial reckoning in the surfing world.

#BREAKING LA County taking first steps to return Manhattan Beach land wrongfully seized from Black family nearly 100 years ago

Manhattan Beach once seized a Black family’s oceanfront resort and ran an entire community of Black beachgoers out of town. But residents have pushed back on the notion that they must atone for injustices committed almost a century ago. Thread ?

Manhattan Beach was once home to Black beachgoers, but the city ran them out. Now it faces a reckoning

When discussing the racial wealth gap, we need to discuss these stories. A black family bought prime Manhattan Beach real estate in 1912 for $1,225. They were harassed by racists and their property was wrongfully seized. That property is worth $75M today

WATCH LIVE: Many people across SoCal appear to be ignoring the “Stay at Home” order as they play basketball on Venice Beach and play apparent drinking games in Manhattan Beach. Similar scenes down in Newport and Huntington beaches.

mucking around in manhattan beach, a bit of fun!

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