Results for Sulfur Dioxide

Add to feed Create your own feed

Latest

Taal's sulfur dioxide emissions drop, but low-frequency quakes persist

The Phivolcs retained Taal Volcano’s status at Alert Level 4, despite the reduced sulfur dioxide emissions and fewer and weaker volcanic earthquakes monitored in the area. | @dygalvezINQ 

READ: Phivolcs' update on #TaalVolcano  as of 8 a.m. today, Jan. 22. Lower emission of sulfur dioxide, a major gas component of magma, was observed, while volcanic quakes persist in the volcano island in the past 24 hours. Alert level 4 remains in effect. | @alexsj_MB 

tweet picture

LOOK: Taal Volcano appears calm on January 21, 2020, but Phivolcs stresses that a hazardous eruption remains possible. Magma continues to rise within Taal, as indicated by volcanic earthquakes, sulfur dioxide emission, and ground deformation. Photos by Rappler #TaalEruption2020 

Phivolcs noted that frequent volcanic earthquakes and the increasing levels of sulfur dioxide were indications of magma movement, which may lead to a possible eruption. #TaalVolcano 

#PTVNEWS | Sulfur dioxide emission at Volcano earthquakes, bumaba

Today’s Phivolcs bulletin notes weak steam emission, lower sulfur dioxide levels (Solidum earlier said this is not the perfect gauge since vents might just be blocked) but also 448 earthquakes monitored by #TaalVolcano  Network in the last 24 hours. | via @KSabilloINQ 

tweet picture

Taal's sulfur dioxide emission, number of volcanic quakes drop

@phivolcs_dost  @KSabilloINQBornas : The fluctuation (of sulfur dioxide levels) actually reflects yung interaction of ground water and the magma...But definitely magma is in the shallow level. | via @KSabilloINQ  #TaalVolcano 

@phivolcs_dost  Bornas: We’ve had a decrease in emission of sulfur dioxide…this is a consequence as weakened steam-plume activity in the main crater | via @KSabilloINQ  #TaalVolcano 

Loading
Loading

Most relevant

This map shows stratospheric sulfur dioxide concentrations on January 13, 2020, as detected by the Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite (OMPS) on the NOAA-NASA Suomi-NPP satellite.

tweet picture

After the #TaalEruption  in the #Philippines , the OMPS sensor mapped the sulfur dioxide plume.

tweet picture

Rolling back Obama-era standards would: 🛢️ Burn a half a million more barrels of oil a day 🌬️ Pump 6 billion more tons of C02 into the air 📈 Raise emissions of lung-damaging sulfur dioxide by 71,000 metric tons via @bopinion 

The recent eruption of Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano triggered a number of gas and lava-oozing fissures in the East Riff Zone of the volcano, seen by satellites in space. Here, sulfur dioxide plumes from the new fissures are shown in yellow & green:

tweet picture

Fuego, one of Central America’s most active volcanoes, produced an explosive eruption on June 3 that sent ash billowing 1000s of meters into the air. One of our satellites captured this image, while another made observations of sulfur dioxide:

tweet picture

Sulfur dioxide emissions, an air pollutant typically produced when coal is burned to generate electricity, increased by 50% in India, while they fell by 75% in China over the last decade:

tweet picture

A volcano eruption in Hawaii has destroyed 26 homes. Cracks in the ground continue to spew lava and emit toxic sulfur dioxide gas, which can lead to health problems. No word yet on when evacuated residents will be allowed to return home.

Satellite finds unreported and major human-made sources of toxic sulfur dioxide emissions:

tweet picture

Loading
Loading