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Scientists won't promise the danger is entirely over, but they have downgraded threat levels at one of the Philippines' most active volcanoes

A team of computer scientists and linguists from the University of the Philippines has developed a community- and mobile phone-based dictionary for the native tongues used in the various regions in the archipelago.

LOOK: Pinoy scientists who worked on the research project on converting wastewater into nutrient-rich fertilizer won the 2019 Newton Prize Philippines. They will be receiving funding worth £ 200K. | via @angelicayyang 

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WATCH: Locals clear roadways as the Taal Volcano in the Philippines continues to spew ash on Monday. The eruption started over the weekend and scientists have designated a danger level 4, meaning a hazardous eruption could happen within hours or days.

Scientists in the Philippines are reiterating the dangers of Taal Volcano, after a local official demanded they change their "opinion" of it — and urged people to defy authorities and return to their homes.

The Taal volcano in the Philippines has become less active since it began spewing steam and ash more than a week ago, but scientists are warning people that there is still a threat of a large-scale eruption.

Scientists in the Philippines warn that the Taal Volcano is still spewing ash more than a week after a local official urged people to defy authorities and return to their homes.

Taal Volcano’s eruptions have eased in the past 24 hours, scientists said, but they warned that the mountain was still threatening hundreds of thousands of people just 40 miles south of Manila, Philippines

PHILIPPINES VOLCANO: The Taal volcano in the Philippines continued to spew ash. The volcano began erupting over the weekend and scientists have designated a danger level 4, meaning a hazardous eruption could happen within hours or days. More videos at

The Australian government failed to heed the warnings of climate scientists more than a decade ago that the bushfire season would intensify and start earlier, an environmental activist said, as he urged the Philippines to learn lessons from the deadly wildfires. #ANCHeadstart 

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Scientists say they've found evidence of a previously unknown human species that lived in what is now the Philippines about 50,000 years ago

In a cave in the Philippines, Scientists discovered the bones of a previously unknown human species that lived at least 50,000 years ago and stood less than 3 feet tall

Scientists say fossils discovered in a cave on the island of Luzon in the Philippines represent a previously unknown branch of humanity, a species they call Homo luzonensis.

Scientists have found a few bones and seven teeth belonging to a previously unknown species of human. They've named the new species Homo luzonensis, after the island of Luzon in the Philippines where it was found. Learn more in this Nature Video.

Scientists have found a few bones and seven teeth belonging to a previously unknown species of human. They've named the new species Homo luzonensis, after the island of Luzon in the Philippines where it was found. Learn more in this Nature Video.

Based on teeth and bones found in the Philippines, an unusual species of humans may have lived as recently as 50,000 years ago. Scientists suspect these they were probably less than four feet tall and had several ape-like features.

In a cave on Luzon Island, in the Philippines, scientists have found the bones of yet another ancient hominin species -- more evidence that the world once was filled with relatives of modern humans.

Scientists in the Philippines say fountains of lava from Mount Mayon volcano soared more than 1,600 feet above the crater during latest eruption.

More than 9,000 people evacuated the area around the Philippines’ most active volcano as scientists warned that a gentle eruption could turn explosive.

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