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Poet Joy Harjo — a member of the Muskogee Creek Nation — has become the first Native American U.S. Poet Laureate. "You hit words together with rhythm and sound quality and fierce playfulness," she says, calling her poetry a kind of music.

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Former Muskogee (Creek) Nation Principal Chief George Tiger pleads guilty to bribery charge, could face up to 37 months in prison.

IT TAKES 2 SECONDS TO SHARE: The Muscogee Creek Nation LighthorsePolice Department is searching for 55-year-old Brenda Holuby, who was last seen in Muskogee on August 7.

Earlier this summer, Joy Harjo became the first Native American woman to be named the U.S. Poet Laureate. Today, she releases her newest collection of poems, which tackles the history of her people—the Muskogee Creek Nation—head-on.

MISSING WOMAN: Brenda Holuby was last seen at a Kum & Go in Muskogee driving a black 2012 Chevy Sonic with Creek Nation tags MN 3755.

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Muskogee Creek nation helps build a state of the art bridge on Garfield road in Okmulgee. A local pastor says they couldn’t get to their church when the old bridge washed away during the flood.

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@JoyHarjo , a member of the Muskogee Creek nation, said she shares this honor with ancestors and teachers who inspired in her a love of poetry, “who taught that words are powerful and can make change.” ✍🏽 #poetlaureate  @librarycongress 

Joy Harjo, a member of the Muskogee Creek Nation, says the appointment 'honors the place of Native people in this country, the place of Native people’s poetry.'

Poet Joy Harjo — a member of the Muskogee Creek Nation — has become the first Native American U.S. Poet Laureate. "You hit words together with rhythm and sound quality and fierce playfulness," she says, calling her poetry a kind of music.

2/ Harjo, part of the Muskogee Creek Nation, draws on Native American stories and languages. "To her, poems are 'carriers of dreams, knowledge and wisdom,' and through them she tells an American story of tradition and loss, reckoning and myth-making," says one librarian.

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