Results for Mary Lou Williams

Add to feed Create your own feed

Latest

Mary Lou Williams' time spent touring the Jim Crow South helped shape her sound, and her theory that black music tradition, born out of suffering, yielded "the greatest and only true art ... in the world."

Before settling in Harlem, Mary Lou Williams traveled the country playing with big bands. The road shaped her sound, and her theory of black music as "the greatest and only true art in the world."

Mary Lou Williams is "the First Lady of Jazz." So at this year's Monterey Jazz Festival, musicians Allison Miller and Derrick Hodge are revisiting her work with imaginative instrumentation in a program titled "Soul on Soul."

From the outside, Mary Lou Williams' home looked like a typical Harlem brownstone. But inside, a generation of young artists etched out a radical agenda that would shift the music world off its axis.

tweet picture

Jazz helped Mary Lou Williams stay alive — but after several draining decades as a musician, she quit the scene. When she returned, she claimed her true power as one of jazz's fiercest advocates.

If she was even partly as prolific as she says she was — claiming hundreds of arrangements a year — pianist Mary Lou Williams had an indelible impact on the sound of the swing era's dance bands.

Mary Lou Williams was a groundbreaking composer, arranger, performer and mentor who was known as "the lady who swings the band."

Mary Lou Williams was known as "the lady who swings the band"; @helensung  won the Mary Lou Williams JazzPiano Competition in 2007. Watch her explain swing and why it's so central to the sound of jazz.

By the age of 15, Mary Lou Williams was a full-time working musician. Jazz kept her alive, but also exhausted her to the point of retreat. When she returned, she claimed her true power as one of jazz's fiercest advocates.

tweet picture

Mary Lou Williams began arranging in 1929; by 1942, she was among the most renowned arrangers in the business. How Mary Lou Williams shaped the sound of the big-band era:

tweet picture

Loading
Loading

Most relevant

These 8 women shaped American popular music. 👑 Bessie Smith 👑 Maybelle Carter 👑 Billie Holiday 👑 Marian Anderson 👑 Ella Fitzgerald 👑 Mary Lou Williams 👑 Celia Cruz 👑 Rosetta Tharpe@nprmusic  is diving into their art and legacies:

Mary Lou Williams was a musical prodigy from a young age, with no formal training. With more than 100 recordings to her credit, Williams wrote music for legendary bandleaders including Duke Ellington. and she was a teacher to jazz great Thelonious Monk. #JazzAppreciationMonth 

tweet picture

For her long, endlessly inventive and astonishing career, Mary Lou Williams belongs at the center of our canon.

tweet picture

The illustrated story of jazz pianist Mary Lou Williams, a pioneering woman of color

tweet picture

Loading
Loading