Results for Illustration George Wafula ✏️

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Today’s African#proverb : The person who burns his granary knows where ash is worth more than grain. A Hausa proverb sent by Adamkolo Mohammed Ibrahim, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula ✏️

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Today’s African#proverb : You cannot bend a dead fish. A Sukuma proverb sent by Martha Deegan, Kahunda, Tanzania. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula ✏️

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Today’s African#proverb : The good milking cow is praised after her death. A Kikuyu proverb sent by Ngugi Muchane, Kenya. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula ✏️

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Today’s African#proverb : Do not kill a snake and swing it around; the ones inside the holes are watching you. A Tsonga proverb sent by Thomas Manyoshi Vhauke, Johannesburgh, South Africa. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula ✏️

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Today’s African#proverb : It is the grass that knows where the snake goes. A Lamba proverb sent by Brian Lilefwe, Chingola, Zambia. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula ✏️

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Today’s African proverb: If a bird does not fly, it goes to bed hungry. An Akan proverb sent by Herbertha Morrison, Accra, Ghana. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula ✏️

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Today’s African proverb: One termite pounded in the mortar does not produce fat. A Zande proverb sent by François Dakahudyno, Kinshasa, DR Congo, and Christopher Sarawa, Yambio, South Sudan. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula ✏️

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Today’s #proverb '>African #proverb : A crab only refuses to carry a load on its head because its eyes are on top of it. A Wolof proverb sent by Joseph Grante and Karamba Jabbi, both from The Gambia. How do you interpret this proverb?  Illustration by George Wafula ✏️

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Today’s African#proverb : The river is never so high that the eyes of a fish are covered. A Yoruba proverb sent by Yemi Akintokun, Ibadan, Nigeria. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula ✏️

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Today’s African proverb: The paste can also strangle the owner who ground it. A Kakwa proverb sent by Taban Chaplain and Kose Bilali, both from Juba, South Sudan. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula ✏️

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Today’s #proverb '>African #proverb : A patient that can swallow food makes the nurse doubtful. A Malagasy proverb sent by Jacob Dior Macueng, Rumbek, South Sudan. How do you interpret this proverb?  Illustration by George Wafula ✏️

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Today’s African#proverb : Treat a guest as a guest for two days, on the third day give him a hoe. A Swahili proverb sent by Notorious Chabiet, Rumbek, South Sudan. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula ✏️

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Today’s African#proverb : The goat that cries the loudest is not the one that will eat the most. Sent by Mabor Dut, Cairo, Egypt. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula ✏️

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Today’s #proverb '>African #proverb : A big snake does not bite itself. A Shona proverb sent by Christopher Kudyahakudadirwe, Cape Town, South Africa. How do you interpret this proverb?  Illustration by George Wafula ✏️

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Today’s African proverb: A bird with a weak skull does not challenge a woodpecker to a fight. An Igbo proverb sent by Cornelius Chinedu Adonu and Okafor Sampson, both from Nigeria. How do you interpret this proverb? Illustration by George Wafula ✏️

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