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H. Lawrence Culp Jr., General Electric’s new C.E.O., faces two major tasks. He must fix G.E.’s ailing power-generation division, and, more immediately, sell assets and trim costs to generate enough cash to stabilize the embattled industrial giant.

H. Lawrence Culp Jr., General Electric’s new C.E.O., faces two major tasks. He must fix G.E.’s ailing power-generation division, and, more immediately, sell assets and trim costs to generate enough cash to stabilize the embattled industrial giant.

Larry Culp, G.E.'S new C.E.O, could use some early wins — but there might not be any

Facebook’s new plan for less news (and less revenue growth), G.E.’s turnaround looks harder than ever, FedEx ended a partnership with the N.R.A., and more in today's DealBook Briefing

In a way, this is a head scratcher, even if Green Power might impose a problem to conventional power gen, since the world - at least the U.S. - has underinvested in power infrastructure RT Job No. 1 for G.E.’s New Chief: Fix Its Ailing Power Business

What California’s plan to put more women on board gets wrong, G.E.’s new chief has a lot to fix, With Nafta solved Trump turns to China, and more in today's DealBook Briefing

Inside McKinsey's biggest-ever crisis, G.E.'s plan to shrink itself, Uber's London victory, and more in today's DealBook Briefing

On Tuesday, G.E.’s board decided to spin off the health care business and sell its 62.5 percent stake in Baker Hughes. Here are some of the main findings from the review that the board is acting on:

On Tuesday, G.E.’s board decided to spin off the health care business and sell its 62.5 percent stake in Baker Hughes. Here are some of the main findings from the review that the board is acting on:

On Tuesday, G.E.’s board decided to spin off the health care business and sell its 62.5 percent stake in Baker Hughes. Here are some of the main findings from the review that the board is acting on:

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S. & P. Dow Jones Indices — which owns the Dow — suggested that the slide in G.E.’s stock price contributed to the decision to remove the company from the index, where it had been a member continuously since 1907. Here's the latest:

G.E.’s stock is down more than 40% over the past 12 months — wiping more than $110 billion off the market capitalization

I've been Immelt fan. But this is disgraceful. "Metaphor for G.E.’s Ills: A Corporate Jet With No Passengers"

A 124-year-old industrial giant is investing big in software. And, G.E.’s C.E.O. says, there is no Plan B.

A 124-year-old industrial giant is investing big in software. And, G.E.’s C.E.O. says, there is no Plan B.

James Surowiecki examines G.E.’s momentous decision to move away from financial services:

GE Capital, once most powerful driver of G.E.’s earnings and a legacy of Jack Welch, is being dismantled

G.E.'s announcement is the end of an era as the company returns to its core

G.E.'s announcement is the end of an era as the company returns to its core

GE Capital, once most powerful driver of G.E.’s earnings and a legacy of Jack Welch, is being dismantled

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