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When students couldn't afford to pay tuition, Berea College eliminated it. In 1920, its board of trustees ruled any unrestricted money given to the school would be invested in an endowment to grow over time. The endowment is now worth about $1.2 billion.

When students couldn't afford to pay tuition, Berea College eliminated it. In 1920, its board of trustees ruled any unrestricted money given to the school would be invested in an endowment to grow over time. The endowment is now worth about $1.2 billion.

When students couldn't afford to pay tuition, Berea College eliminated it. In 1920, its board of trustees ruled any unrestricted money given to the school would be invested in an endowment to grow over time. The endowment is now worth about $1.2 billion.

When students couldn't afford to pay tuition, Berea College eliminated it. In 1920, its board of trustees ruled any unrestricted money given to the school would be invested in an endowment to grow over time. The endowment is now worth about $1.2 billion.

When students couldn't afford to pay tuition, Berea College eliminated it. In 1920, its board of trustees ruled any unrestricted money given to the school would be invested in an endowment to grow over time. The endowment is now worth about $1.2 billion.

When students couldn't afford to pay tuition, Berea College eliminated it. In 1920, its board of trustees ruled any unrestricted money given to the school would be invested in an endowment to grow over time. The endowment is now worth about $1.2 billion.

When students couldn't afford to pay tuition, Berea College eliminated it. In 1920, its board of trustees ruled any unrestricted money given to the school would be invested in an endowment to grow over time. The endowment is now worth about $1.2 billion.

Two colleges in KentuckyBerea College and Alice Lloyd College — charge students nothing for tuition. And it's been that way for decades.

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Berea College only admits high-performing, low-income students; it's completely free and requires students to work for the school. The formula seems to work: It has a $1.2bn endowment and is among the top 50 liberal-arts colleges in the US #SchemeandScandal  #CollegeAdmissions 

Berea College, a small institution that charges no tuition and serves primarily low-income students, would now be among the institutions subject to a tax on endowments:

Congratulations , you used a Byrd Rule challenge to make sure a luxury tax hits the endowment of Berea College, which offers free tuition to poor families sending their first children to college.

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