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#ICYMI : Before Jane Goodall, Anne Innis Dagg, at 23, went by herself to Africa in 1956. She is credited as the first westerner to do extensive field research there, observing a species in its own environment.

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#ICYMI : Before Jane Goodall, Anne Innis Dagg, at 23, went by herself to Africa in 1956. She is credited as the first westerner to do extensive field research there, observing a species in its own environment.

tweet picture

#ICYMI : Before Jane Goodall, Anne Innis Dagg, at 23, went by herself to Africa in 1956. She is credited as the first westerner to do extensive field research there, observing a species in its own environment.

tweet picture

#ICYMI : Before Jane Goodall, Anne Innis Dagg, at 23, went by herself to Africa in 1956. She is credited as the first westerner to do extensive field research there, observing a species in its own environment.

tweet picture

#ICYMI : Before Jane Goodall, Anne Innis Dagg, at 23, went by herself to Africa in 1956. She is credited as the first westerner to do extensive field research there, observing a species in its own environment.

tweet picture

Canadian biologist Anne Dagg was denied tenure decades ago, despite her pioneering research on giraffes. She's finally getting recognition in her field — and she wants to make sure young women scientists today don't have to fight the way she did.

My undergrad advisor, Anne Innes Dagg, was the first biologist to publish on this (though as she pointed out, definitely not the first to witness it). She also wrote a scorchingly brilliant critique of evolutionary psychology

Before Jane Goodall and Dian Fossey, there was Canadian zoologist Anne Dagg. tells the story of Dagg's early research into giraffes in South Africa and how her promising career was thwarted by a sexist academic system.

Happy Family Day! This morning on #thecurrentcbc , we’re talking about the current protests erupting in Haiti, unusual and often harrowing parenting practices through the ages and revisiting the story of Anne Innis Dagg, the first zoologist to study giraffes in the wild.

A new film captures the life of Anne Innis Dagg, the groundbreaking biologist who made her first trip to study giraffes in the wild in 1956 when she was 23.

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Before Jane Goodall and Dian Fossey -- there was Canadian zoologist Anne Dagg. tells the story of her early research into giraffes in South Africa — and how sexism in academia derailed a promising career.

Before Jane Goodall's study of chimpanzees and Dian Fossey's work with gorillas, Canadian Anne Innis Dagg was the first to study giraffes in the wild

A new film captures the life of Anne Innis Dagg, the groundbreaking biologist who made her first trip to study giraffes in the wild in 1956 when she was 23.

A new film captures the life of Anne Innis Dagg, the groundbreaking biologist who made her first trip to study giraffes in the wild in 1956 when she was 23.

Canadian biologist Anne Dagg was denied tenure decades ago, despite her pioneering research on giraffes. She's finally getting recognition in her field — and she wants to make sure young women scientists today don't have to fight the way she did.

Anne Innis Dagg traveled to Africa in the 1950s and was the first to study giraffes in the wild.

For more, read Anne Innis Dagg's outstanding "Love of Shopping is Not a Gene"

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